Authors

JIN-TAO ZHANG1, XIANG LI1, QING-YU JIANG1, YI-LIANG LI1, CUI-RONG LIU1, XIAO-YAN HUANG1, HUI XIA1, GUI- FEN FU2, YONG-FENG SI1

Departments

1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Oncology, The People’s Hospital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; 6 Taoyuan Road, Nanning 530021, China - 2Department of Nursing, The People’s Hospital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; 6 Taoyuan Road, Nanning 530021, China

Abstract

Objective: This study aims to investigate the occurrence of negative emotion and quality of life in patients with newly diagno- sed nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and analyze its correlation.

Methods: The quality of life of 75 NPC patients was investigated at the time of admission, during the treatment and at the end of treatment using the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (QLQ-C30), Zung self-rating depression scale (SDS) and self-rating anxiety scale (SAS).

Results: At the time of admission, the middle point of treatment and at the end of treatment, the SAS score was 41.78 ± 8.26, 45.19 ± 9.44 and 47.92 ± 10.59, respectively; and the SDS score was 51.55 ± 8.82, 52.35 ± 8.74 and 54.27 ± 9.06, respectively. The incidence of anxiety was highest the middle point of treatment (P<0.05). At the end of treatment, the differences in physical, emotio- nal and cognitive functions, fatigue, pain, insomnia and constipation symptoms at the time of admission and the middle point of treat- ment were statistically significant (P<0.05). Anxiety and depression were negatively correlated with the functional area and overall health status but were positively correlated with symptoms (P<0.05).

Conclusion: The occurrence of negative emotion at different stages of hospitalization in patients with newly diagnosed NPC varies, and quality of life is affected at different degrees. Corresponding psychological nursing should be conducted for patients at different stages, in order to reduce the adverse effects of negative emotion on the mental health of patients and improve its rehabilita- tion effect.

Keywords

nasopharyngeal carcinoma; chemoradiotherapy; quality of life;negative emotions

DOI:

10.19193/0393-6384_2019_1_21