Authors

MASSIMO ALIVERTI1, ILARIA GORINI2, MELANIA BORGO2, MARTA LICATA2, MARIANO MARTINI5, IGNAZIO VECCHIO3, CRISTINA TORNALI4

Departments

1University of Insubria (Varese) Italy, 2Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences, University of Insubria (Varese) Italy - 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Catania, Italy - 4Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Catania, Italy - 5Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), Section of History of Medicine and Ethics, University of Genoa, Italy

Abstract

Fernando Ortiz was a Cuban anthropologist as well as one of the most prominent figures in 20th-century Latin-American cultu- re. His interests spanned from law to criminology, from anthropology to sociology, from psychology to ethnomedicine, and from folk- lore to musicology. In this paper, we will focus on two essays that he wrote in Italian, “Criminality of the Black in Cuba” and “Criminal superstitions in Cuba”. Noteworthy is the relationship between Ortiz and the Italian school of criminology. He spent seve- ral years in Genoa where he met Cesare Lombroso, one of the leading figures of the “positive school”. Ortiz drew inspiration from Cesare Lombroso and contextualised these ideas in Cuban society.

Keywords

Fernando Ortiz, criminal anthropology, criminal superstitions

DOI:

10.19193/0393-6384_2017_3_069