Authors

EHSAN SADEGHI1, MARYAM SHABANI2, MAJID MAHMOODI3, FATEME ASADI*4, KIOMARS SHARAFI5,6, NEZAM MIRZAEI7,6, GHOBAD MOHAMMADI8

Departments

1Associate Professor, Research Center for Environmental Determinants of Health (RCEDH), Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran - 2MSc. Food Chemistry, Vice-Chancellery for Food and Drug, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran - 3Pharmacist, Vice-Chancellery for Food and Drug, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran - 4Student Research Committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran - 5Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran - 6Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran - 7Environmental Health Research Center, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran - 8Associate Professor, Pharmacy School, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran

Abstract

Introduction: Zearalenone as mycoestrogen find in human food and animal food. Estrogenic properties depending on the Biotransformation level, in this regard, there are some reports of food contamination by mycotoxins such as ZEA. This study has investigated ZEA mycotoxin in edible oils.

Materials and methods: 104 random samples of 8 different brands edible oil (corn, sunflower, mix) collected and evaluated from Kermanshah stores in 2013. Determination of ZEA levels was done by using high performance liquid chromatography and fluo- rescence detector. Detection and quantification was limits of the method and order of micrograms per kilogram.

Results: Zearalenone levels in all samples was positive and samples levels was less than the limit specified by the Standards and Industrial Research Institute of Iran. The minimum and maximum ZEA mycotoxin, respectively, with a sunflower oil average 2.67μg/kg Bw and E brand of corn oil with average was 70.78 μg/kg Bw. results of ANOVA significant contamination of corn oil, sunflower and blend oil (P 0.001).

Conclusion: Due to the increased levels of ZEA in corn oil liquid than other oils tested and on the other hand, the consumption of food contaminated with mycotoxins Fungal toxins receive provisional tolerable daily intake is much higher than Expert Committee on Food Additives of the FAO / WHO determined therefore, prevention of mycotoxin contamination ours to control pre-and post-har- vest And consideration of relevant experiences and practices is essential to a great extent.

Keywords

Edible Oil, Zearalenone mycotoxin, HPLC.